Monday, July 3, 2017

Career Conversations with an Anderson Alum




Embrace the Jungle Gym

By Terri Nikole Baca

It was more than a few years ago when I first read Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In: Women, Work And The Will To Lead, but one of the book’s themes has resonated with me since.  Sandberg thoughtfully shares that it is better to think in terms of a career “jungle gym” rather than a career “ladder.”  Ladders have traditionally been a metaphor to describe career growth, but this is 2017, and I can assure new graduates that success will come from a jungle gym of career turns and leaps.  These maneuverers may seem risky in the moment, but will guide you to success as long as you do your part by always demonstrating excellent work ethic, integrity, and a willingness to learn. 

When I graduated from UNM with a BBA in 2005, I felt pressure to interview with companies in my field of training, which was finance.  But the truth is, I was 22 years old and my “field of training” in the real world had largely been working student positions at UNM and waiting tables on the weekends for extra cash.  I had no idea what my next step on the ladder was supposed to be—so I decided to keep going to school and enrolled at the UNM School of Law in Fall of that year.

I graduated in 2008 with no job offer in sight and unsure whether I was interested in practicing law.  Between studying for the bar exam and worrying about my future, I was too anxious to calm down and enjoy my last summer before summer breaks no longer existed.  I took the bar exam in July and was waiting for the results when I got a call from then Public Regulation Commission chairman Ben Ray Luján’s campaign staff.  Chairman Luján was in the middle of a campaign for the U.S. Congress, for the seat formerly held by now Senator Tom Udall.  His staff was looking for a campaign field director to help, and they had heard of me through some campaign volunteer work I had done in law school.  “Sure,” I said.  Maybe knocking on doors and making call lists had nothing to do with a law degree, but I needed a job and this sounded fun. 

Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of General Electric, has said that she likes to hire people who can “Figure it Out” (FIO).  These are people who can successfully handle tough situations or working outside their comfort zone—like those who have served in Peace Corps or Teach for America.  Campaign work was my “FIO” and the skills I learned in those months---though I didn’t realize it at the time—certainly prepared me for my future jungle gym leaps.

Five months later, my first “real job” out of school landed me in Washington DC, working for newly-elected Representative Luján as his Legislative Counsel.  I dove right in to the legislative process and federal government, focusing on technology, energy, education, and telecommunication policy.  I took these skills with me to my next job in the nonprofit sector as policy director for a national education organization, then shifted to managing public policy for a local chamber of commerce.  Finally, I landed in the private sector at AT&T, my most recent turn on the jungle gym, a position I was only able to secure because of the broad experience I had gained through my jungle gym of career moves.  I hope that as new or recent graduates, or as professionals looking for a career change, you will embrace the jungle gym and not be afraid to take chances with your career path---even if it means taking a pay cut or making a lateral move to get somewhere better in the long run.   



As Director of External Affairs, Terri Nikole Baca manages government and public affairs for AT&T in New Mexico. Terri Nikole joined AT&T after serving as senior vice president of public policy at the Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce. In this role, Terri Nikole managed the development of the Chamber’s policy positions on a variety of issues impacting the business community. Terri Nikole also oversaw the Chamber’s government relations strategy and execution of city, county and state advocacy plans. Terri Nikole's professional experience includes project management, public relations and government affairs, and state, federal and tribal government policymaking. Prior to joining the Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce, Terri Nikole served as policy director for a national education nonprofit, where she advanced policy initiatives to support STEM education and workforce development. Before her work in the nonprofit sector, Terri Nikole spent several years on Capitol Hill serving as legislative counsel to U.S. Congressman Ben Ray Luján where she worked on telecommunications, energy, science, technology, and education issues.

Terri Nikole was born and raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico and holds a BBA in Finance and a Juris Doctor from the University of New Mexico. Her professional memberships include the State Bar of New Mexico, New Mexico Hispanic Bar Association and New Mexico Women’s Bar Association.

Friday, June 9, 2017

June Opportunities, Week of June 5, 2017

Marketing Intern
Baby Page
To apply: Contact Career Services at Anderson for instructions

Account Manager
Delta Group Electronics
To apply: Send resume, cover letter, salary history and salary requirements to Delta Group Electronics, Inc at ctennyson@deltagroupinc.com

Finance Manager
Meow Wolf
To apply: Visit https://jobs.meowwolf.com/job/finance-manager/.  

Campus Day at Federal Reserve of Kansas City
Monday, July 10
For more information or to register, visit www.kansascityfed.org

Monday, June 5, 2017

Career Conversations with an Anderson Alum




Business Management meets Non-Profit

By Krisztina Ford

I came to the non-profit field in a rather roundabout way.

I grew up in Hungary, and in most European systems, the government maintains social services and taxes support healthcare, education, childcare, etc. There is less need in such a system for a non-governmental sector to respond to gaps in social services – so it’s no wonder that non-profits were a new concept to me.

I earned my Master’s in Political Science in Budapest.  One of my classes was about various political systems and, of course, the United States was front and center in the discussions. I had high expectations about the U.S.

When I moved here, however, I was shocked by the lack of attention to social services and a social net and surprised by the silos in which NGOs are forced to function. They operate without adequate funding – suffer from a lack of innovation – and they struggle to create any sense that they are part of a system that collectively addresses the underlying needs of those in need.

I started to work for non-profits because I was called to work toward establishing systems in the field of social justice.

… and all this sounds idealistic and dreamy – but it’s still what gets me out of bed each day.

I soon found though that idealism is not enough for a non-profit to get by and get ahead.

As I was climbing the management ladder through various positions at local agencies, it became very apparent that, in a non-profit, one had better know how to read financials, craft a budget, supervise and hire people, manage volunteers, write business plans, expand programs, understand how to diversify funding, fundraise, run a board, advocate in legislative sessions, understand what policies affect operations… and what changes at the Santa Fe Roundhouse or in DC will influence governing rules and revenue …

And if you are looking for the story that changed everything – well, it might have been this one: I’m sitting in a finance committee meeting one day with the financial people of the board, CPAs and bankers – my boss, the CEO, leans over with the P&L in her hand and whispers in my ear, “Are the parentheses good or bad?”

Within a year, I was back in school – at UNM, in the executive MBA program. I didn’t need an education on those parentheses, but I sure didn’t want to learn about the basics from staff and rely on what I am able to pick up in meetings.

I found those 26 months to be the best investment in a non-profit management job – it not only taught me the basics of writing with the appropriate audience in mind, but also about the complex tasks of finance and business planning.

Most important – it created a network of classmates who have been instrumental as I took my place in the business community.

The status quo is never good enough. There is always more to be done. The task is to figure out how to become a more effective tool to serve personal goals and to make meaningful contributions to a community.



Krisztina Ford moved to Albuquerque, NM from Budapest, Hungary in 2000 and has over ten years’ experience in non-profit management. Her vision is to create strong collaborations within non-profit organizations, government agencies and for profit businesses in order to better serve the community and to build healthy societies.

She has served on the Mayor’s Task Force on Child Abuse, is the Vice President on the Board of the New Mexico Behavioral Health Providers Alliance and is a board member of the Child Welfare League of America based in Washington, DC. She is a recipient of the Business Weekly’s Top CEO Award and Women of Influence Award.

Before coming to All Faiths, Krisztina worked with health care organizations and agencies that served the developmentally disabled. She holds an MBA from UNM’s Anderson School of Management and a Master’s degree in Political Science from Budapest. Krisztina is currently the CEO/President of All Faiths.

Friday, June 2, 2017

New Internship and Job Opportunities

Inside Sales
Bralco Metals
To Apply: Send email to JVOJTECH@BRALCO.COM

HP MBA Internship
Apply online: https://h30631.www3.hp.com/form/candidate/51876/3544/4744246

Research Associate, New Mexico Economic Development Partnership
To apply please send a resume to Doreen Avila, New Mexico Partnership:
Davila@nmpartnership.com

Marketing Coordinator
Apply online at www.sandia.org/careers

Program Coordinator, UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research
To apply, visit: https://unm.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?id=739&site

Accounting Clerk, Santa Fe Preparatory School
Please email Director of Finance Bruce Sachs (bsachs@sfprep.org)

Accounting Assistant, School of Architecture & Planning
To apply, visit UNMJobs

Software Applications Developer
Bernalillo County Metropolitan Court
To apply: visit www.metrocourt.state.nm.us

Management Trainee Program
National Electric Supply
To apply: visit https://www.infinityhr.com/extranet/JobSearch.aspx?id=64002&aid=13801

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Career Conversations with an Anderson Alum




Career Insights from the Past 20 years: Journey from South Valley to Silicon Valley


Since my graduation from the Anderson School of Management back in December 1996, I’ve had a chance to reflect on my diverse career path over the past 20+ years.  As with any experienced professional out there in the industry, everyone has ‘nuggets of wisdom’ to share that will hopefully resonate and help guide you towards good decisions in your personal journey.

I was born and raised in Albuquerque, grew up in the South Valley, and attended UNM with an unwavering focus on attaining my management degree and exploring the world with whatever career path I would create for myself.  Along that path, I’ve lived in Houston, London, and now the San Francisco Bay Area in Northern California.  I’ve worked across numerous industry verticals including: U.S. government (Air Force & NASA), oil/gas (Shell), tech - hardware/services (Hewlett-Packard), retail (Gap), tech – software (Adobe).  Along this journey, I’ve learned a great deal from navigating these large and complex corporate environments and traveling around the globe.

All that said, here are some words of advice from a ‘seasoned’ fellow Lobo:

Network, Network, Network
I can’t stress how important it is to learn the power of networking early in your career.  You need to build your brand with your immediate team, within the company, and at various industry events, conferences, and socials.  If you can navigate this well, you’ll have the opportunity to make great connections with both internal management and industry colleagues that’ll open doors with exciting opportunities.

Work Hard…Play Hard
I learned the value of hard work early on from my family.  When you work hard, focus your efforts on that next goal, and finally achieve it, you learn that anything is within reach and ‘the sky’s the limit.’  Balancing this is the importance of having fun as well to avoid burning out.  By rewarding yourself with the ability to do the things you enjoy outside of work, you’ll stay motivated to work hard and achieve bigger/better outcomes.

Continuous Learning
Never stop learning new skills, theory, and real-world application.  You can pursue additional degrees, professional certifications, soft skill training courses and remember to take advantage of any employer-offered training funding. 

Net/net: you don’t want to find yourself as expendable because you have a limited offering.  Always stay relevant, be mindful of industry trends, and continuously invest in yourself.

Give Back When You Can
I’ve had the honor to volunteer and serve many organizations in several different capacities (board memberships, recruiting, mentoring, teaching, building, etc.).  Find your passion with what you can share and give back to others that can benefit from your insights and abilities.  Volunteering takes time, but it’s an investment where we all win when we help each other to succeed and grow.

Never Become Complacent
I learned this mid-career and wish I would’ve realized it sooner.  In a large company, you’ll have the opportunity to move around and tackle many different jobs if you so choose.  There’s nothing wrong with this, but I’ve also learned that you have much larger opportunities to grow with expanded roles and sometimes better compensations when you take that leap from what’s comfortable and move to new challenges in different companies and geographies.

I know it sounds cliché, but there’s a reason why people say, “Don’t be afraid of change.”  You truly need to embrace it…and the sooner the better.

Go Global
While at Anderson, I focused on marketing and international management.  I knew that experiencing the world would be extremely important in shaping my views and learnings of different cultures.  Since then, I’ve had the chance to travel the globe and learn the cultural richness this world has to offer.

Remember to always be open-minded and respectful when meeting new people, trying new foods, and learning traditions and ways of doing business in other areas.

Whether you’re just graduating or years into your career, these ‘nuggets’ have guided me to be a good corporate and global citizen, and proud UNM alumnus.  Good luck…work hard…and have fun!

Best,
Antonio Humphreys


Antonio Humphreys is a strategic sourcing and marketing expert with 20 years’ professional experience in global sourcing and negotiations, marketing and advertising management, sales consulting, and business planning across multiple industry verticals and geographies (including NASA, Shell Oil, Hewlett-Packard, Gap Inc., and Adobe Systems Inc.).

He is a native of Albuquerque, New Mexico and has lived in Houston, Texas and London, England.  He currently resides in the San Francisco Bay Area and works in ‘Silicon Valley’.

Antonio earned his Bachelor of Business Administration at the University of New Mexico and a Master of Business Administration at the University of Houston.  He has served on a board of director capacity for Habitat for Humanity, Sourcing Industry Group University, Association of National Advertisers Mentor Chair and UNM Anderson School Alumni Council.  He was also a management adjunct professor at Lone Star College and served as Chairman for their Business Advisory Board. 

His passions include travel, hiking, teaching, and U.S. soccer.